The Sunday Times.

 

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Philando Castile’s funeral procession.

As a resident of the Marshall Field Garden housing complex in Old Town, Sherise McDaniel lives near some of the city’s best selective-enrollment schools.

“I drive by Walter Payton [College Prep] everyday,” said McDaniel, who has lived there for 16 years.

But when it comes time for her middle school-aged son to pick a high school, McDaniel said the chances of him getting into the elite school are “next to none.”

“The selective-enrollment situation … I’m sick of it,” she said. “It’s a horrible process for kids to fight and claw to get into these schools. Very few kids get in, and the rest are left out there.” DNAinfo

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Needless to say, Washington’s first reaction was instructive. Turks must support their “democratically elected government”. The “democracy” bit was rather hard to swallow; even more painful to recall, however, was the very same government’s reaction to the overthrow of Mohamed Morsi’s “democratically elected” government in Egypt in 2013 – when Washington very definitely did not ask Egypt’s people to support Morsi and quickly gave its support to a military coup far more bloody than the attempted putsch in Turkey. Had the Turkish army been successful, be sure Erdogan would have been treated as dismissively as the unfortunate Morsi.

But what do you expect when Western nations prefer stability to freedom and dignity? That’s why they are prepared to accept Iran’s troops and loyal Iraqi militiaman joining in the battle against Isis – as well as the poor 700 missing Sunnis who “disappeared” after the recapture of Fallujah – and that’s why the “Assad must go” routine has been quietly dropped. Now that Bashar al-Assad has outlived David Cameron’s premiership – and will almost certainly outlast Obama’s presidency – the regime in Damascus will look with wondering eyes at the events in Turkey this weekend. Robert Fisk

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Look around your school. Who would be the person to talk to your students about race and how it affects minorities? Who would start the conversation about Alton Sterling or Philando Castile?

If you cannot think of anyone, there is an issue. If you don’t think children need to discuss racially charged incidents, there is an even bigger issue.

Minority children are now the majority of students in the United States. Hispanic and black children are historically among the most under-served children of the American education system. In the same vein, Hispanic and black people are disproportionately victims of police brutality. They are killed at rates that far exceed their makeup of the American population.

So why aren’t some schools talking to students about police brutality? And what does this mean for retaining teachers of color? Trakela Small

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Welcome to Cleveland.

3 thoughts on “The Sunday Times.

  1. Our country will support a coup from time to time if it is in the best interest of American corporations that have stockholders who are politicians or individuals who work in cooperation with these politicians. What do the politicians often like to say after phony rants of BS? Oh yeah, it’s “God Bess America”.

  2. On these could I can assure you from sources I trust that were not involved and we are in fact totally lost in the region after our foolish Iraq invasion.

  3. Reblogged this on Mister Journalism: "Reading, Sharing, Discussing, Learning" and commented:
    Look around your school. Who would be the person to talk to your students about race and how it affects minorities? Who would start the conversation about Alton Sterling or Philando Castile?

    If you cannot think of anyone, there is an issue. If you don’t think children need to discuss racially charged incidents, there is an even bigger issue.

    Minority children are now the majority of students in the United States. Hispanic and black children are historically among the most under-served children of the American education system. In the same vein, Hispanic and black people are disproportionately victims of police brutality. They are killed at rates that far exceed their makeup of the American population.

    So why aren’t some schools talking to students about police brutality? And what does this mean for retaining teachers of color?” – Trakela Small

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