Sunday chowdah.


Keith Lamont Scott and family.


I have lived a long, good life. I will not be here to see the consequences if this evil takes root in our country.  But your children and mine will be.  And their children.  And their children’s children.

All of us still yearn to remain free. It is what we stand for as a country.  I have always been deeply proud to be an American. In the time I have left, I pray that will never change.  In our democracy, the decision to remain free is ours to make.

My 100th birthday is exactly one month and one day after the next presidential election. I’d like to celebrate it by blowing out the candles on my cake, then whistling “Happy Days Are Here Again.”

As my beloved friend Lauren Bacall once said, “You know how to whistle don’t you?  You just put your lips together and blow.”  Kirk Douglas



(Will) Guzzardi, who is a Chicago Democrat, says if Illinois taxed wealthy people and profitable corporations at higher rates the state could bring in enough money to do this, while also erasing the deficit.

“I think if we’re going to ask the taxpayer to contribute more in order to fix this current budget crisis — we’re going to have to ask the taxpayers to contribute more. And if we’re going to do that, we need to be able to say: Here’s what you’re going to get in exchange,” he said.

Guzzardi says he’ll travel to campuses around the state this fall to promote the idea. NPR



National Museum of African American History and Culture.


A blue-ribbon commission had just excoriated Goldman Sachs and other Wall Street banks for fueling the financial crisis. Prosecutors were investigating whether Goldman had misled investors. The company was a whipping boy for politicians looking to lay blame for the crash.

But in spring of 2011, Lloyd C. Blankfein, leading one of the nation’s most reviled companies, found himself onstage with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, one of the nation’s most admired public figures at the time. And Mrs. Clinton had come to praise Goldman Sachs.

The State Department, Mrs. Clinton announced that day in an auditorium in its Foggy Bottom headquarters, would throw its weight behind a Goldman philanthropic initiative aimed at encouraging female entrepreneurs around the world — a program Goldman viewed as central to rehabilitating its reputation. NY Times


Recent polls show deep allegiance to the Republican nominee by majorities of white non-college educated voters of both genders, many of them blue-collar workers who’ve traditionally supported Democrats. Then there are union women like Geanangel, who helped build Pittsburgh’s airport and Three Rivers Stadium, feeling the same angst about plant closures and wage stagnation as male colleagues but seeing more help from a Clinton White House.

In the battleground states of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Florida, Nevada and Wisconsin, 76 percent of women in the AFL-CIO plan to vote for Clinton, while 62 percent of men do, according to a recent poll by the union. That may be a small club, but it’s viewed by Democrats as a very powerful one — especially in a race being waged on the margins.

“Women are more activist than men,” said AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, “and understand that Clinton supports collective bargaining, raising the minimum wage and paid time off for illness and family care.” Bloomberg

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