Sunday breakfast.

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Steven Biko would have turned 70 years-old today.

Educators have paid too little heed to this criminal justice crisis. Criminal justice reform should be a policy priority for educators who are committed to improving the achievement of African American children. While reform of federal policy may seem implausible in a Trump administration, educators can seize opportunities for such advocacy at state and local levels because many more parents are incarcerated in state than in federal prisons. In 2014, over 700,000 prisoners nationwide were serving sentences of a year or longer for nonviolent crimes. Over 600,000 of these were in state, not federal, prisons. Economic Policy Institute

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Most Americans believe, with good cause, that our nation has been hugely positive in world affairs, promoting democracy and human rights, and taking on tyrants in two world wars. And the U.S. military amounts to the biggest humanitarian agency in the world, rushing relief to regions plagued by hurricanes and tidal waves. Yet all these virtues need to be considered in the context of American eagerness to meddle in other nations’ affairs. In the past century, for various reasons, Washington has played a role in either ousting governments or interfering in elections in Japan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Afghanistan, Iran, Lebanon, Italy, the Congo, Chile, Haiti, Grenada, Panama, Honduras and Guatemala — and those are just the interventions that have been confirmed.

This history led Peter Kornbluh, director of the National Security Archive, to decry “a long pattern of U.S. manipulation, bribery and covert operations to influence the political trajectory of countless countries around the world” in a 1997 interview. San Diego Union-Tribune

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We have replicated in our organization some of the same inefficiencies we fight against in our school districts. The challenges of the past can inform our future, but we can’t continue to use the same strategies to solve our new challenges.

We tie the hands of our leaders through complicated resolutions and policies. We lack the flexibility to rapidly adapt in a texting, Facebook, technologically “do it now” society.

We must promote and enable greater flexibility within NEA governance structures for a rapid response to the changing political and educational environments. We must take the primary responsibility for the quality of teaching and for student learning.

It is time for our union to evolve. The Nebraska State Education Association’s new executive director, Maddie Fennell .

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One thought on “Sunday breakfast.

  1. What was the Japan intervention? I would note almost all those interventions ended up blowing uo inbour face……the Russians can now enjoy that experience

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