Encouraged by DeVos, Cardinal Cupich asks Rahm for Catholic school vouchers. “Of course we will discuss,” says Rahm.

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The Illinois legislature is considering diverting $100 million of education funding to public school vouchers. Just released emails between Chicago’s Catholic Cardinal Blase Cupich and Rahm Emanuel show they talked about the same thing last April.

The Sun-Times:

Cardinal Blasé Cupich emailed the mayor in mid-April after learning that U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos was scheduling meetings with big-city mayors on Trump administration education priorities.

“I am personally interested in the proposal to fund a $20 billion federal education tax credit as part of the federal tax reform. I am convinced that this could be an enormous boost to the Chicago schools and the thousands of parents who use our [Catholic] schools,” Cupich wrote. “I am grateful that you understand the importance of school choice for poor families who see this as a viable way for the family to move out of poverty.”

Cupich closed by wishing the mayor a “blessed Passover to you and the family.”

Emanuel replied, “Have a Good Friday. Of course we will discuss.”

WBEZ:

In Cupich’s email exchange with Emanuel, the cardinal referenced U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos’ push to expand private school choice by creating a federal education tax credit program.

The Trump administration hasn’t released specific details, but the idea is to give tax credits to anyone donating to a fund that would allow eligible students to attend a private school of their choosing. The same concept is now being discussed by Illinois lawmakers in the negotiations to overhaul public school funding across the state.

Parents and teachers will gather at the Thompson Center this morning, Thursday, at 11am to call for an override of Governor Rauner’s veto of the school funding bill and oppose any state voucher plan.

This Friday’s Hitting Left with the Klonsky Brothers will have as our guests Jay C. Rehak of the Chicago Teachers Pension Fund and teacher pension activist John Dillon. Live at 11am on 105.5fm and streaming at http://www.lumpen.radio.

We also discussed school funding with State Senator Dan Biss on last week’s Hitting Left. You can listen to that podcast here.

7 Replies to “Encouraged by DeVos, Cardinal Cupich asks Rahm for Catholic school vouchers. “Of course we will discuss,” says Rahm.”

  1. One more step towards total destruction of public schools. Security is spending a million a month to protect DeVos because she is so hated by the pubic. She and tRump are both wasters of taxpayer money. How many millions has tRump wasted by his need to go golfing?

  2. I attended all Catholic schools – one grade school, 2 high schools (we moved ), 3 undergraduate, and 3 graduate. My father (a product of CPS schools) worked 3 jobs to send us to private school. I’m sure my parents would have been all for vouchers in the 50s to 70s when we were in school. But, it was a choice they made, a choice parents make today. I would have loved walking to a public school with my neighborhood friends instead of riding a bus one or two towns away (we lived in the NW suburbs and our parish didn’t have a school).

    Vouchers take money away from public schools. They are state contributions to church. I’m sure there are a lot of rich Catholics (and other denominations) eager to donate big money to Rahm’ s kingdom for their golden tickets.

  3. I too, attended and taught within the Catholic Schools before becoming a suburban public school teacher. My children went to Catholic Schools as well.
    Both types of education had their strengths and weaknesses.

    However, the idea of giving vouchers to any non-public school bothers me. Public schools need the public money that vouchers would deplete. Further, it will give the government the power to dictate what can or cannot be part of the curriculum and it intertwines religion (start them young)with the governing process (think :The Inquisition or, Ayatollahs as leaders of countries). Either way it does not work well in the long run.

    Better to keep the two separate like ammonia and bleach or something volatile
    will emerge.

  4. August 11, 2017
    SOS (save our schools)

    Beginning my 54th year as a public school teacher, I remain opposed to vouchers for private schools (home school as well). As a Catholic grade and high school graduate, I have no objection to private schools and support a long time practice of providing safe bus travel to private schools and food subsidy to “hungry” impoverished students.

    The “attack” on public schools at local, state, and federal levels is “on the rise”. It is imperative that citizens do all that is necessary to preserve, protect, and tax support public school education.

    The addition of federal tax credit vouchers in addition to state credit (see attached Illinois tax credit rules) takes needed dollars from public schools.

    Yours in education,

    Dr. Charles W. Birch, public school teacher

    Illinois Department of Revenue
    Constance Beard, Director
    Publication 132 February 2015
    Education Expense Credit General Rules and Requirements
    for Parents and Guardians
    The information in this publication
    is current as of the date of the
    publication. Please visit our website at
    tax.illinois.gov to verify you have the
    most current revision.
    This publication is written in the plain
    English style so the tax information is
    easier to understand. As a result, we
    do not directly quote Illinois statutes
    and the Illinois Administrative Code.
    The contents of this publication are
    informational only and do not take
    the place of statutes, rules, and court
    decisions. For many topics covered
    in this publication, we have provided
    a reference to the applicable section
    or part of the Illinois Administrative
    Code for further clarification or more
    detail. All of the sections and parts
    referenced can be found in Title 86 of
    the Illinois Administrative Code.
    About this publication
    Publication 132, Education Expense Credit General Rules and Requirements for
    Parents and Guardians, provides parents and guardians the requirements for qualified
    education expenses. The objectives of Publication 132 are to
    identify who is eligible to take an education expense credit.
    identify qualified schools.
    identify qualified education expenses.
    identify education expenses that do not qualify.
    list required attachments to Form IL-1040, Individual Income Tax Return, for parents
    or guardians who are claiming an education expense credit.
    This publication does not apply to home schooled students. For information
    about the education expense credit for home schooled students, see Publication 119,
    Education Expense Credit General Rules and Requirements for Home Schools.
    Get forms and other information faster and easier at tax.illinois.gov
    Taxpayer Bill of Rights
    You have the right to call the Department of Revenue for help in resolving tax problems.
    You have the right to privacy and confidentiality under most tax laws.
    You have the right to respond, within specified time periods, to Department notices by asking questions, paying the amount
    due, or providing proof to refute the Department’s findings.
    You have the right to appeal Department decisions, in many instances, within specified time periods, by asking for
    Department review or by taking the issue to court.
    If you have overpaid your taxes, you have the right, within specified time periods, to a credit (or, in some cases, a refund) of
    that overpayment.
    For more information about these rights and other Department procedures, you may write us at the following address:
    Problems Resolution Office
    Illinois Department of Revenue
    PO Box 19014
    Springfield, IL 62794-9014
    Education Expense Credit General Rules and
    Requirements for Parents and Guardians
    Page 2 of 4 PUB-132 (R-02/15)
    Contents
    General Information
    Who may claim an education expense credit? ……………………………………………………………..2
    What schools qualify for an education expense credit? ………………………………………………….2
    What are qualified education expenses? ……………………………………………………………………..2
    What education expenses do not qualify? ……………………………………………………………………3
    How much credit will I be allowed? ……………………………………………………………………………..3
    How should I figure a credit for education expenses, and what must I attach to my
    Form IL-1040 when I claim this credit? ………………………………………………………………………..3
    Office Locations ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….4
    For Information or Forms …………………………………………………………………………………………..4
    What are qualified education expenses?
    In general, qualified education expenses are the amounts paid
    in excess of $250 for tuition, book fees, and lab fees at the
    school where the student is enrolled in kindergarten through
    twelfth grade during the regular school year.
    Specifically, qualified education expenses include the amount of
    tuition (including summer school classes required for
    elementary or secondary graduation requirements).
    book fees paid for the rental of books that were required as a
    part of the school’s education program.
    lab fees paid for the use of supplies, equipment, materials, or
    instruments that were required as part of a lab course in the
    school’s education program.
    For example, if you rented a musical instrument from the
    school (not from a business)
    for a class, or
    for participation in an extracurricular activity that resulted
    in a credit toward completion of the school’s education
    program,
    this rental expense qualifies as an education expense.
    General Information
    Who may claim an education expense
    credit?
    You may figure a credit for qualified education expenses, in
    excess of $250, you paid during the tax year if
    you were the parent or legal guardian of a full-time student
    who was under the age of 21 at the close of the school year.
    you and your student were Illinois residents when you paid
    the expenses, and
    your student attended kindergarten through twelfth grade at a
    public or nonpublic school in Illinois during the tax year.
    If you are the parents or legal guardians of a qualified
    student and you are filing separate Illinois returns, you may
    each claim an education expense credit. However, you both may
    not claim a credit for the same expenses, and the total amount
    of credit claimed between both parents or guardians may not
    exceed $500.
    What schools qualify for an education
    expense credit?
    Public and nonpublic elementary and secondary schools in
    Illinois that satisfy the requirements of the truancy law in Section
    26-1 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/26-1] and, if required, are
    in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 qualify
    as Illinois schools for the purpose of the education expense
    credit.
    PUB-132 (R-02/15) Page 3 of 4
    Education Expense Credit General Rules and
    Requirements for Parents and Guardians
    What education expenses do not
    qualify?
    Education expenses that do not qualify for an education
    expense credit include expenses paid
    to a daycare, preschool, college, university, independent
    tutoring service, or trade school.
    for the purchase of supplies, books or equipment that
    are not significantly used up during the school year (e.g.,
    purchasing musical instruments, costumes for a play).
    for the use of supplies, equipment, materials, or instruments
    if the program does not result in a credit toward completion
    of the school’s education program.
    directly to a business (e.g., renting a musical instrument
    from a music store).
    for tutoring or enrichment classes that do not count toward
    meeting your required curriculum.
    for after school care, even if paid to the school.
    for yourself or your spouse.

    How much credit will I be allowed?
    You will be allowed 25 percent of your student’s qualified
    education expenses after the first $250. Your total credit may
    not exceed $500 in any year, regardless of the number of
    qualifying students.
    How should I figure a credit for
    education expenses, and what must I
    attach to my Form IL-1040 when I claim
    this credit?
    For tax years
    2010 and after, you must complete Schedule ICR, Illinois
    Credits, including Section B, Lines 12 and 13, to figure a
    credit for education expenses.
    Schedule ICR and any “Receipt for Qualified K-12
    Education Expenses” that you received from the school to
    your Form IL-1040.
    2008 and 2009, you must complete Schedule ICR, Illinois
    Credits, to figure a credit for education expenses.
    Schedule ICR and the “Receipt for Qualified K-12
    Education Expenses” that you received from the school to
    your Form IL-1040. If you did not obtain a receipt from the
    school, you must also complete Section B, Lines 12
    and 13 of Schedule ICR to figure your qualified education
    expenses.
    2007 and earlier, if you
    did not obtain a receipt from the school, you must
    complete Schedule ED, Credit for K-12 Education
    Expenses.
    Schedule ED (not the ED Worksheet) to your
    Form IL-1040.
    received a receipt from the school for the qualified
    education expenses you paid, you must complete
    the “K-12 Education Expense (ED) Worksheet” to
    figure the amount of your credit. You will find a copy of the
    worksheet in the Form IL-1040 Instructions for the year
    you are filing.
    The “Receipt for Qualified K-12 Education
    Expenses” that you received from the school (not the
    ED Worksheet) to your Form IL-1040.
    The receipt you received from the school must contain
    the following information:
    the calendar year during which you paid the education
    expenses,
    the name and address of the school,
    the name and address of the parent or guardian,
    the name and Social Security number of each qualifying
    student,
    the grade in which each student was enrolled during the
    calendar year, and
    the total education expenses paid for each student for
    tuition, book fees, and lab fees during the calendar year.
    If the receipt does not contain all the information required, you
    should contact the school for a proper receipt.
    Education Expense Credit General Rules and
    Requirements for Parents and Guardians
    Page 4 of 4 PUB-132 (R-02/15)
    Visit our website at tax.illinois.gov.
    Call us at 1 800 732-8866 or 217 782-3336.
    Call our TDD (telecommunications device for the deaf) at 1 800 544-5304.
    Write us at Illinois Department of Revenue, P.O. Box 19044, Springfield, IL 62794-9044.
    For information
    or forms
    15 Executive Drive
    Business Center One, Suite 2
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    618 624-6773
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    815 987-5210
    Office locations Maine North Regional Building
    9511 Harrison Street FA 203
    Des Plaines, Illinois 60016-1563
    847 294-4200
    James R. Thompson Center
    Concourse Level
    100 West Randolph Street
    Chicago, Illinois 60601-3274
    800 732-8866
    217 782-3336
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    101 West Jefferson
    Springfield, Illinois 62702
    800 732-8866

  5. Send public money to Catholic schools? Aren’t Catholic schools part of the institution which permitted, hid and refused to sanction child sexual abuse or the abusers?

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