The closer you are to actual health care delivery and patient contact, the less you make.

Healthcare salaries

I received this from an old friend who is a health care professional:

Fred published a chart in a previous post about salaries for various workers.

His analysis is on target, and the same can be said about healthcare work.

Attached is crude chart (I used a better one when I taught at a university on public health).

As you can see, the closer you are to direct patient care – let’s say a health worker who changes diapers in a nursing home for dementia patients or who walks up 3 flights to bathe a shut-in senior – the less you make.

Then there are the nurses and doctors.

Hospital CEO’s, even in non-profits, are in the 7-figure level.

And so on up the ladder, until the ones making the most money never set foot in a healthcare delivery setting.

Just look up how much the CEO of United Health makes.

Those in the classroom make less than administrators and those in various for-profit educational ventures, including the testing companies.

One thought on “The closer you are to actual health care delivery and patient contact, the less you make.

  1. So do administrators make too much or do teachers make too little? How about the unions advocate for lower administrator pay in order to fund teacher pensions? How many front-line teachers would sign their name to that? (Their contract presumably would protect them from retaliation.) I understand the argument that available funds could be increased by increasing tax revenues. Or making the CEO of United Health pay more taxes. But raising taxes in Illinois is a big lift, politically. I expect you-all are still looking at the data. And this post provides very interested data points. How about a platform for fixing the under-funding problem? Graduated income tax will probably be the first item, but is there anything else to be considered? Teachers have a few weeks off to put some thoughts on the table.

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