Urgent. Act now. edTPA rule change.

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State Representative Linda Chapa La Via is a sponsor of HB 6128, rule changes to edTPA.

Tomorrow, Tuesday, April 5, the Illinois House of Representative’s Elementary and Secondary Education: Licensing Oversight Committee will hold a hearing to consider HB 6128. 

HB 6128, sponsored by Rep Linda Chapa LaVia and Kelly Burke would move the required evidence-based assessment of teacher effectiveness (currently the edTPA™) out of student teaching and into the first two years of teaching on a provisional license. If successful, the bill would:

·         Remove the burden of the edTPA from student teaching, student teachers, and cooperating teachers.

·         Put Illinois candidates on equal footing with out of state candidates who currently are allowed to teach on a provisional license and given up to two years to pass the edTPA™  in their own classrooms

·         Compel ISBE to open the discussion about which evidence-based assessment should be adopted in Administrative Rules to satisfy the law in Illinois and when it must be passed.

Please complete an online Witness Slip as a proponent of HB6128 before the hearing begins tomorrow at 9 a.m., which will urge members of the committee to support the bill.  Wording of the bill and its summary are currently being amended to more accurately reflect our goals from what’s online.  We have attached both the original and revised versions of the bill, as well as a Statement of Explanation for you to review.

Here is the link to the online witness slip for tomorrow’s hearing:

http://my.ilga.gov/WitnessSlip/Create/95662?committeeHearingId=13523&LegislationId=95662&HCommittees4%2F7%2F2016-page=1&committeeid=0&chamber=H&nodays=7&_=1459430108166

It’s critically important for the House committee members to know you support the bill.  Please submit an electronic Witness Slip today and spread the word.

Onward,

Julie Peters and Larry Sondler

Illinois Coalition for edTPA™ Rule Change

ICRchange@gmail.com

http://icrchange.weebly.com/

End edTPA in New York state.

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Hi Mr. Klonsky,

I am a student in a teacher certification program at CUNY Queens College in NY. Over the past few weeks I have been trying to mobilize a student movement against the edTPA. Six days ago I wrote a petition and have just over 500 supporters. The faculty at my university will be taking this petition to Albany. With the recent change in leadership at the Board of Regents we are optimistic about ending the use of the edTPA as a certification requirement in NY. 

I came across your blog today, and it seems you have actively opposed use of the exam in Illinois. We are looking for more support and wonder if this is something you might consider sharing with your community and followers. Although it is a petition aimed at Albany, we hope that we can set the precedent for change in other states as well. 

This is a link to my petition: 

https://www.change.org/p/new-york-state-senate-end-the-edtpa-in-nys

Many thanks and all the best!

Zoe Spanos

A critical look at edTPA.

I just received word from Diane Horwitz that the program at DePaul has had such enthusiastic feedback that they have had to move to a larger room. They had been previously booked solid. Now a few more seats have opened up.

Still, you should RSVP if you are planning on attending.

Winter 2016 forum flyer

edTPA as a deterrent to a positive pre-service experience.

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Responding to my minutes from today’s S.O.R.E. meeting:

Fred,

As a Coordinator of Clinical Experiences, I receive ample feedback on the deterrent edTPA can be to a positive and profitable experience for pre-service teachers.

First of all, I oversee the experience of Traditional and non-traditional students during their professional semester (student teaching). Across the board, all candidates have traditionally, and still currently experience high stress levels, and huge learning curves during their student teaching semester. In order to better prepare future teachers there have been amazing initiatives wihin the last 20 years, like year long Professional Development Schools.

These alternative programs, put into place in partnerships between universities and school districts have recognized the benefit of more time, feedback from master teachers, and opportunities for diverse experiences. Now, Pearson comes along pushing for a consequential assessment that’s been added to the candidate’s already overwhelming load, And most candidates (typically 21 – 22 years old) have to “get it” all twithin a 14 – 15 week timeframe. Pearson and others try to pretend that it is for the good of the student teacher and of the profession. Ridiculous!

The cooperating teacher’s wisdom of practice applied to daily formal and informal observations of a teacher candidate, benefit the candidate with practical feedback and that promotes an environment of continual growth, is ignored from an evaluative standpoint.

Also, the breadth of experience of university supervisors who have been career educators is ignored in favor of a complex assessment that is de-contextualized and evaluated by unknown persons with who knows what for credentials. And what have these time honored evaluatory systems been replaced by? The anser is a three task process that puts heavy weight on written responses and requires videotaping of public school students in a day and time when man parents are not allowing their children’s pictures to even be posted in the hallways next to their classrooms.

In my mind the same outcry of test bias toward minority candidates that was leveled against the National Board Teacher Certification process should be raised toward the edTPA. I’ve seen how varying states and districts have bent over backwards in providing support to the self-selected NBTC candidates, as it’s become more prestigious for districts to post statistics of high percentages of NBTC teachers. And yet our state, among others (is pushing this similar process, that benefits Pearson alone) is now placing a similarly heavy burden on a pre-service teacher, who have no choice, are at the beginning of their skills development, and they’ve made it consequential to their lisencure.

ISBE – good intentions? Maybe.

Pearson – monetary profit? Definitely!

– Cheryl

edTPA’s threat to student privacy.

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– from More than a Score

Springfield, IL. Tuesday, a representative of the Chicago coalition More than a Score shared disturbing information with an Illinois House education committee concerning new dangers to student privacy. As of September 2015, student teachers in Illinois must now submit videos filmed in public school classrooms to education conglomerate Pearson as part of a standardized assessment. The assessment, known as the edTPA, is required by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) for new teacher licensure.

Parents must grant their consent for children to appear in the videos. The rights to the videos then reside with Pearson—possibly to be used for purposes other than certifying the student teacher. Although the videos are intended to be confidential, numerous examples of the videos are found online, in violation of both the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the guidelines provided by ISBE and Pearson.

The House Elementary and Secondary Education Committee on School Curriculum & Policies held the subject-matter hearing on the edTPA because of the numerous issues this latest high-stakes standardized test presents for the teacher education process in Illinois.

The required video submission pits the interest of student teachers against those of their students. Chicago parent Roberta Salas refused to allow her child to participate in an edTPA video during a pilot program this past spring. “I felt bad for our student teacher, but I encouraged other parents to read these permission slips very closely and to be thoughtful about signing,” said Salas.

“The process to certify teachers in Illinois should not depend on pressuring parents to hand over their child’s personally identifiable information to Pearson,” testified Cassie Creswell, organizer with More Than A Score. “My organization will continue to inform parents that we have no confidence in either Pearson or the edTPA and that they should seriously consider refusing consent.“

Pearson, the world’s largest education corporation, also has multi-million dollar contracts with the state of Illinois for the controversial PARCC test, the recently revised GED, and one other required test for teacher certification, the TAP. In 2011 Illinois sued Pearson for $1.7 million for the unexplained loss of student scores on a previous contract. In 2013, Pearson had a multi-million settlement with the New York State Attorney General for having inappropriately paid for travel junkets for state education officers, including Illinois’ previous state superintendent Chris Koch.

More Than A Score helped expose the privacy threat posed by InBloom, a joint venture of Rupert Murdoch’s education company Amplify and the Gates Foundation. Illinois withdrew from the InBloom project in 2013. InBloom closed altogether in 2014 after strong parental opposition to potential breaches of student privacy from around the country.

Full testimony available at http://bit.ly/MTASedTPA.

Yestereday’s Illinois House hearing on edTPA.

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Illinois State Representative Christian Mitchell stayed long enough to voice support for edTPA before leaving the committee hearing.

Sandy Deines is a friend, colleague and retired high school teacher from Park Ridge who currently supervises student teachers.

She knows from first hand experience what damage edTPA is doing to the teaching profession.

Sandy went to Springfield yesterday to testify against edTPA as a member of the Illinois Coalition for edTPA Rule Change.

I spoke with her this morning and she told me she felt good about the hearing. More than a few people there told me that there was bi-partisan skepticism of edTPA from members of the committee. There were many pointed questions directed at the witness from the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE).

You can watch the committee hearing here.

One prominent supporter of edTPA on the committee was 26th District Representative Christian Mitchell.

Mitchell stayed only long enough at the hearing to express his support for edTPA. He was not there to hear opposition witnesses.

Cassie Cresswell of More Than A Score, who also was lobbying testifying in Springfield yesterday against edTPA, posted about Mitchell on her Facebook page, “Jay Travis’ opponent non-ironically quoted George W. Bush today at a House education committee hearing.”

If you needed another reason to vote for Jay Travis in the 26th District.

The Illinois Education Association supports edTPA and put a staffer up to testify. Sandy Deines said she spoke with IEA’s chief lobbyist, Jim Reed. When she asked him to explain the IEA’s support, Sandy said he smiled sheepishly and shrugged.

The Illinois Federation of Teachers opposes edTPA. Their lobbyists, I am told, were helpful in having the House committee hearing take place.

Everyone I spoke with expressed appreciation that there was a hearing.

It was Representative Guzzardi who zeroed in on the shrinking number of minority teachers and the negative impact edTPA is having on minority teachers entering the profession.

It was left to other organizations and social media to get the word out to teachers and parents. We were able to mobilize 300 witness slips opposing edTPA within 24 hours. Imagine if the IFT had joined in the effort.

Meanwhile, search the IEA website about edTPA. There is nothing. Since they support it, what are they afraid of? Earlier this year I went to Springfield to lobby for parental rights to opt out of PARCC testing and found myself on the opposite side of the IEA. Now this.

Someone needs to explain why the IEA is so consistently on the wrong side of ed reform issues.

What happens now?

State Representative Will Guzzardi, a critic of edTPA, says he would prefer that the ISBE make the changes themselves rather than have the legislature take any action.

He says there is talk of having the scoring take place in-house rather than outsourcing to profit-making Pearson.

edTPA, the Illinois House hearing, Will Guzzardi and the IFT.

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State Representative Will Guzzardi has concerns about edTPA. He sits on the House education committee.

Our efforts over the past 24 hours in getting folks to submit witness slips (you still can this morning) to the House Elementary and Secondary Education Committee opposing edTPA has been a great success. It has resulted in over 230 opposition slips with less than 20 in support at 8AM this morning.

Thank you.

Illinois 39th State Representative Will Guzzardi is a member of the House Committee on Elementary and Secondary Education that has called the hearing on edTPA at 10:30 AM.

I asked him for a statement on edTPA.

He wrote me:

“I look forward to a rigorous hearing on Ed TPA today in Springfield. I worry that it presents many of the same challenges as other standardized testing regime’s: excessively high stakes placed on a single days performance; evaluation by a faraway entity with no context about the student or classroom; bias against people of color; and a high financial cost with no proof that it actually solves a problem.”

As usual, he gets it.

Meanwhile John Cusick, a legislative director of the IFT wrote me to complain about my characterization of the IFT on this issue.

Fred –

In terms of your IFT comments.

This committee hearing is scheduled today because IFT worked quietly for many months with former Rep. Golar, Other reps, house staff, and the Higher Ed coalition challenging EdTPA, to bring EdTPA concerns to the fore.

So your point is not on the mark.

Please check with the leads of the Higher Ed Coalition opposing EdTPA.

Thank you,

John

What did I write that is “off the mark”?

Neither the IEA nor the IFT have educated or mobilized members over this shift toward’s privatizing teacher licensure even though it impacts every future union member.

Sorry, John. My characterization is right on the money. Quiet behind the scenes efforts are fine. But educating and mobilizing union members are the union’s jobs one and two.

I will give John and the IFT credit: They have done more than the IEA on this issue.

But ask a member of the IFT what edTPA is and what their union is doing about it. Most have no idea about either.

This is not just a higher ed issue.

This is an issue for our profession. There would be thousands of slips in opposition if the unions had been doing their job.

Illinois legislative hearing on edTPA tomorrow. Send a witness slip. Say no.

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An Illinois House committee has scheduled a hearing on edTPA for 10:30 tomorrow morning.

I have been writing on the problems with edTPA all through this past summer and into the Fall.

All the posts can be found here.

edTPA will become the way teachers in Illinois will be certified and licensed.

Rather than emphasizing the practicum  and student teaching component, those wishing to become teachers will be evaluated by an outside evaluator, one who never meets the student or cooperating teacher or who knows the classroom, the students, the community or the school. The certification will be based on a one-size-fits-all rubric and a video-tape. And it will cost $300 with the money going to the private for-profit education monopoly, Pearson.

This morning Jim Broadway writes:

All this for a job that’s never been paid comparably with private sector jobs demanding similar skill levels and imposing similar levels of responsibility, that now lacks the job-security component formerly enjoyed by those who survived a four-year probation period (tenure), a job whose once-comforting promise of economic security in retirement has been conspicuously eroded and remains in dire jeopardy today. Good luck with that.

This experiment has future findings of unintended consequences all over it.

Yet aside from that it is just plain bad practice.

As I pointed out in a recent article from Medill Reports:

Klonsky, the retired teacher, said edTPA “bypasses the important relationship between the mentee and mentor” in that it puts more emphasis on the teaching candidates’ test portfolio and single videotaped class instruction, rather than on the dynamic between the student teacher and his or her mentor, who has seen them in action during their student teaching.

“EdTPA says that relationship doesn’t matter,” Klonsky said. “What matters is someone taking a video of you. You send that video to someone who doesn’t know you, doesn’t know the classroom, doesn’t know the kids, and doesn’t know the context.”

Klonsky also said the proponents of edTPA have a vested interest in the test.

“They’re hucksters. They’re selling a program,” Klonsky said.

Neither the IEA nor the IFT have educated or mobilized members over this shift toward’s privatizing teacher licensure even though it impacts every future union member.

The Illinois House committee on PK-12 School Curriculum & Policies is scheduled to discuss “Illinois new teacher licensure assessment” at 10:30 Tuesday in Capitol Room  114. Click here for audio/video of the hearing.

You do not have to appear before the committee to be a witness.

Please fill out a witness slip.

Tim Furman  has provided a simple guide for providing testimony to a House committee and filing a witness slip. This short instructional video was about PARCC. But it is easy enough to follow if you have never filed a witness slip before. Just substitute edTPA for PARCC.

Medill Reports: Want to be a teacher? There’s a new test you need to pass.

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-Excerpt reprinted from Medill Reports: Want to be a teacher? There’s a new test you need to pass.

Read the entire article here.

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The recent report on edTPA evaluated results for around 18,000 teaching candidates from across the U.S. — and almost 80 percent of them were white.

The lack of teachers of color is especially apparent in Chicago, where only 23% and 19% of CPS teachers are black and Hispanic, respectively, according to the CPS website.

Klonsky, the retired teacher, said edTPA “bypasses the important relationship between the mentee and mentor” in that it puts more emphasis on the teaching candidates’ test portfolio and single videotaped class instruction, rather than on the dynamic between the student teacher and his or her mentor, who has seen them in action during their student teaching.

“EdTPA says that relationship doesn’t matter,” Klonsky said. “What matters is someone taking a video of you. You send that video to someone who doesn’t know you, doesn’t know the classroom, doesn’t know the kids, and doesn’t know the context.”

Klonsky also said the proponents of edTPA have a vested interest in the test.

“They’re hucksters. They’re selling a program,” Klonsky said.